Tag Archives: internet

70mph Blog

12 Feb

Vast amounts of geographical research has been focused on the impact of the Internet Revolution on geography as we know it. The decoupling of time, space/place and activity in recent years has completely re-invented societies and economies within the last decade. As a result, the geographies of the Internet have been heavily theorised and mapped; most of which is interesting stuff!

HOWEVER, I am posting this blog whilst traveling at 70mph (Mr Officer) along the M5 motorway on my way to the Manchester derby – of course I’m not the driver today!

….. From a geographers eye, the fact that I can blog, tweet, follow, chat or study anything on the world wide web whilst travelling at such speeds in a car is quite frankly scary. Some would say it is liberating, some would strongly argue against this! Much more importantly, the opportunity to capitalise on use of time is amazing; perhaps time and activity have never been so together?

Introducing the fastest evolving organism: ‘The Internet’

18 Jan

It is no secret that the internet has disbanded the geographies of time, place and activities. People can now create and access information where and when they want (given some access and a little bit of education). With a growing population of 2 billion users, this revolutionary world has given birth to an intricate set of ‘Online Communities’ or, what academic geographers may call ‘Neo-tribes’. Combing this rapid growth with the freedom of time, place and activities has created an organic like world which evolves to meet the population’s needs.

Artist Randall Munroe’s  “Map of Online Communities” (below) exemplifies how the e-world has evolved at an alarming rate; survival of the fittest being clear cut (poor Myspace!)

Online Community Map, 2007

The Online Community: 2007

Online Communities Map: 2010

Online Communities Map: 2010

Back before the internet days (when the geographies of time, place and activities were less unsettled), there would be chaos if communities grew and landscapes changed that much in just three years…. Don’t you agree?

This BIG question is… What will it be like in 2013?